Schooling the Generations: Education and the Relevance of Mumia Abu-Jamal in Times of Crisis

January 27, 2014
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Mumia Abu-Jamal's Radical Pedagogy

By Christopher M. Tinson Creating a classroom environment that fosters radical education first requires courage to confront uncomfortable truths about American society. Introducing students to Mumia Abu-Jamal‘s radical pedagogy at one of this country’s predominantly white, liberal arts, private colleges, however, also requires negotiating. Most of my students come from communities that have not been subject to heavy police presence. Many have not studied the history of racial oppression in...
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Silencing the Record: Misrepresentation, Gender Politics, and Truth in the Case of Mumia Abu-Jamal

January 26, 2014
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Silencing the Record: Misrepresentation, Gender Politics, and Truth in the Case of Mumia Abu-Jamal

By Johanna Fernandez In the last week, conservative media outlets zealously revisited the case of celebrated political prisoner and radio journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal. This time he was attacked in connection with President Barack Obama’s nomination of Debo Adegbile to head the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. That Adegbile is also a trustee of Connecticut College–one of the sponsors of The Feminist Wire–may also be a...
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Confined Writers and Their Criminal Writings

January 26, 2014
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Confined Writers and Their Criminal Writings

By Emahunn Raheem Ali Campbell Last month, The New York Times reported a discovery made in Rochester, New York about what we now know as the first prison memoir written by an African American. Written in 1858 by Robert (Austin) Reed, “he 304-page memoir titled ‘The Life and Adventures of a Haunted Convict, or the Inmate of a Gloomy Prison,’ describes the experiences of the author…from the 1830s to...
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K.O.S. (Determination): Black Communities Keeping It Real and Right

January 26, 2014
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K.O.S. (Determination): Black Communities Keeping It Real and Right

By Liz Derias “…among those that have least, beat hearts of hope, fly sparks of overcoming.” ~ Mumia Abu Jamal, Death Blossoms: Reflections from a Prisoner of Conscience Like many other cities across the US in the 1980’s muddling through the residue of Carter’s liberalism and the immorality of Reganomics, Philadelphia, PA was a hotbed of violence and crime, was riddled with the emergence of crack cocaine, faced ravishing...
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Re-imagining Black Power

January 26, 2014
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Re-imagining Black Power

By Nyle Fort If Black Power were a play who would be its main characters? What would be its major themes? And what scenes would develop its drama? For most of my life when I thought of Black Power a flood of images came to mind: Stokley, Huey, George Jackson, Amiri Baraka, Attica, Watts, and pretty much all things “black,” “radical,” and, of course, male. Besides Assata Shakur and Angela...
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TFW Attends SIROW 2014

January 25, 2014
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SIROW 2014

Managing Editor Monica J. Casper and Associate Editor Heidi R. Lewis are having a blast at the SIROW 2014 Regional Heads and Directors Meeting in Tempe, AZ! SIROW, which is the Southwest Institute for Research on Women, is housed in the Gender and Women’s Studies Department at the University of Arizona, where Monica is Department Head and Professor. Founded in 1979, SIROW researchers work collaboratively with several University of Arizona...
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Mumia is a Yogi

January 25, 2014
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By Jamila K. Wilson Breathe…Breathe.  Deep breaths.  Allow your inhale to expand your belly, and intentionally press your bellybutton back into your body.  Use this breath to center yourself in this moment.  You are where you are supposed to be.  The external environment might feel harsh and oppressive; but let this breath ground you in the knowledge that you are free and content. You are not your body.  You are...
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Mumia Abu-Jamal and My Survival

January 25, 2014
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LiveFrom

By Gabriel Teodros A distant father figure who I’ve never once met. A living hero who’s words written from a prison cell had a deeper effect and helped raise me more than most teachers I’ve ever had. Mumia let me know with every offering that I wasn’t alone, and he did it from a place of isolation that I can’t even fathom. I hear his voice via collect phone calls...
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Remember

January 25, 2014
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By Micol Seigel In the winter of 2001-2002, the dust of the Twin Towers continued to settle, it seemed to me, along with the snow.  I spent that year teaching eager young minds in an elite liberal arts college in Maine.  From a chilly office in the gothic stone building of the History department, I mourned, filed my dissertation, and hoped for an academic career.  Many nights I spent...
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Trayvon Triptych (a poem)

January 25, 2014
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Scott Jones-Trayvon Triptych

By Quincy Scott Jones   I. George Zimmerman Presses the Mute Button They say I was angry The same country that promotes drunks and pot heads to President   The same eleven o’clock news that shows sobering views of Trayvon in his hoodie   next to sketches of the same height weight race under the crawl of “Still at Large” They talk about the bar fights   remind me...
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My North Star: How Mumia Abu-Jamal Led Me To Activism

January 24, 2014
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Imarisha-My North Star 2

By Walidah Imarisha In high school in a small town in Oregon, I found guidance in the most unlikely of places. Mrs. Borrevick wore bright lipstick drawn around her actual lips. To make her mouth appear bigger. She didn’t have to do the same with her heart. She was the guidance counselor, took in the misfits and rejects. Mrs. Borrevick became my AP History Independent Study teacher after I...
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