Introducing Nina Sharma

May 12, 2015
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Introducing Nina Sharma

NINA SHARMA is a writer from Edison, New Jersey. Her work has been featured in Teachers & Writers Magazine, Drunken Boat, Certain Circuits Magazine, The Feminist Wire, Reverie: Midwest African American Literature, and Ginosko Literary Journal. She recently was awarded a fellowship from the Vermont Studio Center and nominated for a Pushcart Prize for her nonfiction. She is formerly the Director of Public Programs at the Asian American Writers’...
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How Sex Reassignment Surgery Works in America

May 11, 2015
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How Sex Reassignment Surgery Works in America

By Eric Plemons Fascination with Bruce Jenner’s possible transition from male to female has prompted a deluge of writing on Jenner and on the process of transition, more broadly. One such article, by Lenny Bernstein, appeared on the Washington Post “To Your Health” blog in February. Using Jenner as a point of departure, Bernstein’s article, “Here’s How Sex Reassignment Surgery Works,” offered what seemed to be a general overview...
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Highway of Tears: A Review

May 7, 2015
By
Mavis Erickson

I first viewed the stunning documentary Highway of Tears, directed by Matt Smiley and produced by Smiley and Carly Pope, during a week in which I was also teaching geographer Katherine McKittrick’s Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle. McKittrick explores the complex racial and gender entanglements of place and space. She writes, “Concealment, marginalization, boundaries are important social processes. We make concealment happen; it is not...
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COLLEGE FEMINISMS: POETRY BY WAFA SIMPORE

May 6, 2015
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~~~~~~~~~ Step by step is an understatement of the Complexity Confusion Exhaustion That comes along with this work, Deconstruction Reconstruction so that many of us can carry on Carry onto a place of understanding Willingness Strength   Until the lion has a historian, the hunter will always be the hero. – African Proverb   Histories Histories is where we are grounded To carry on the stepping stone to one...
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3 poems by Eve Kenneally

May 6, 2015
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South   In between, I brush my teeth in a truck stop and remember how to fishtail my hair. Mostly my hands cramp around the steering wheel, strange names echoing behind my eyes. Chilhowie. Jensi feeds me strips of seaweed, wasabi salt stinging my lips. Alhowe. Lauryn Hill croons under my questions about exits and rest stops. Blountville. I hate everything about driving. My shirt slicks my back, shoulders...
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Personal Is Political: Trans Feminine Humility

May 5, 2015
By
Espinoza

While internalized misogyny tells me I need to be humble and quiet, internalized transmisogyny tells me I need to be even more humble and quiet—this has effectively shut me up. Although I have begun to challenge this notion within myself, the question becomes: How do we begin to fight this in the world at large? I hope and believe that talking about it openly will be a start.
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Thugs R’ Us

May 4, 2015
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Thugs R’ Us

“Thugs”—that was virtually the first word the world heard out of Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s pedigreed mouth during her press conference last week on the uprising against state violence and the apparent murder of 25 year-old Freddie Gray.  Facing intense backlash, Rawlings-Blake tempered her comments at a black church where, fittingly, disgraced and/or contrite members of the black political elite often go for redemption.  Rawlings-Blake’s thug diatribe stood in...
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A Love Letter to our People in #BlackSpring Time 

May 2, 2015
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A Love Letter to our People in #BlackSpring Time 

By: Darnell L. Moore and Kai M. Green Family, Beyond anything you’ve been called, whether from the mouth of our nation’s first Black president, the Black Mayor of Baltimore or the FOX News Network, know you are a gracious people. And we love you. Rocks tossed from young black hands, police cruisers flipped by disappointed black citizens, and embers flying because black folk are tired of hashtags memorializing the black...
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Climate Change and Feminist Environmentalisms: Closing Remarks

May 1, 2015
By
no-gender-justice1

By Cristina Awadalla, Piper Coutinho-Sledge, Alison Criscitiello, Julie Gorecki, and Sonalini Sapra Climate change impacts us all, from the itty-bitty crawler in your garden to the mother in Africa who spends most of her days dangerously trekking for clean water. This forum has concentrated on varying subjects, which shed light on how the climate crisis disproportionately affects Indigenous and Global Southern Women and minorities around the world. The current state...
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How Did This Happen? Capitalism’s Double Subordination of Women and Nature

May 1, 2015
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Federici discusses Hans Weiditz’s "The Witch’s Herbary" (1532) engraving in her book, which shows women’s special knowledge of medicinal herbs and treatments including contraceptives that threatened the new capitalist order.

By Julie Gorecki Waves of women most impacted by environmental destruction are spearheading viable solutions to the climate crisis by advocating that there can be “no climate justice without gender justice.” For them, the development of urban cities, the reduction of productive farming, and the poisoning of their native lands by industrial pollution are all directly linked to an industrial economy dependent on disenfranchising ecologically sustainable models of traditional...
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Eco-Feminist Appropriations of Indigenous Feminisms and Environmental Violence

April 30, 2015
By
Winona LaDuke

By Lindsay Nixon Settler environmental movements attempting to organize in solidarity with Indigenous peoples have frequently relied on the evocation of eco-feminism and, in doing so, have offered analyses around Indigenous women’s and Two-Spirit peoples’ relationships and responsibilities to land. This has seemed like both an appropriation of similar Indigenous organizing as well as an appropriation of Indigenous spiritualities, cultures, and traditional Indigenous knowledges. Indigenous women and Two-Spirit peoples...
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