A poem by Niki Tulk

June 17, 2015
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  Song For My Daughter   You are nearly here. Around and above me slithering voices, anxious midwife barks. My own voice surges from a galaxy cloaked in breath and stygian song. I am volcano. I am tsunami. I forge the deep waters. Atomic, I shift mountain ranges with each arc of my body.   The hospital hush. In the birth room, electronics twitch in sonic orbit; antiseptic, pink...
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COLLEGE FEMINISMS: Exploring Meghan Trainor’s “Feminist” Message

June 16, 2015
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By Sly West     A “new” wave of feminism (and anti-feminism) in pop culture has resulted in a newfound respect for feminist pop songs and icons. One of the more popular feminism-focused celebrities on today’s stage is Meghan Trainor, a self-proclaimed body positive feminist who specializes in poppy, aesthetic doo-wop songs that encourage young girls to reject societal pressures and love themselves for who they are, not what...
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Op-Ed: Broaden Sexual Assault Education and Legislation to Include All Students, in College and Not

June 15, 2015
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Op-Ed: Broaden Sexual Assault Education and Legislation to Include All Students, in College and Not

By Maria Hengeveld    Since its opening in 1895, Low Memorial Library has become one of Columbia University’s most admired architectural sites. Its magnificent façade and columns draw photographic attention from tourists, guests, and prospective students on a daily basis. A few weeks ago, the building’s attic confronted visitors, most of whom prospective students, with an unequivocal message. With bright blue flashing letters, a projector wrote over the attic’s...
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“Race and gender are not the same!” is not a Good Response to the “Transracial” / Transgender Question OR We Can and Must Do Better

June 14, 2015
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“Race and gender are not the same!” is not a Good Response to the “Transracial” / Transgender Question OR We Can and Must Do Better

I remember Justine Black from elementary school. She was smart. She was brown, but not brown like me. I was black like most of the other kids in our class. I remember Justine because she was a good friend of mine. I knew that she was from some other place outside of the U.S. and not Africa (in elementary school I didn’t know how vast the black diaspora was),...
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COLLEGE FEMINISMS: Becoming Whole

June 12, 2015
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By Alisha Hiebert   She tells me to rock my hips. Back and forth, side to side. I rock my hips – thinking of their wideness and fullness and how someone once told me that these are prerequisites for good birthing hips – keeping the hoop balanced and spinning. I forgot what it was like to feel my own body. To have it belong solely to me and no...
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“Flawless” by Laurie Reid

June 10, 2015
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Flawless          Sheila is fat, real fat. Sheila calls herself that. When Sheila stood up and introduced herself to her Women’s Studies class, the professors’ mouth dropped so far and so fast that she couldn’t keep her snack from falling out and onto her blouse. Her entire face looked as though it had slid right off its bone. An expedient recovery though.With no time to shake off the wasabi...
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COLLEGE FEMINISMS: Why Human Rights Don’t Work for Me

June 9, 2015
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Eleanor Roosevelt and The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

By Lydia Lopez     Recently, I attended a panel called ​“Women’s Rights in the 21st Century: Fifteen Years After United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security,” which was led by prominent members of the international human rights field. UN Resolution 1325 is colloquially known as the “international bill of rights for women” and addresses the presumption that human rights are women rights, particularly in the...
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Police Criminals and the Brutalization of Black Girls

June 9, 2015
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Police Criminals and the Brutalization of Black Girls

In Alice Walker’s short story “The Flowers,” a little girl happens upon the decomposing body of a lynching victim while she is out picking flowers.  Walker contrasts the light tranquility of the girl’s walk with the savagery of her discovery; suggesting that to be a black child is to never be shielded from the “adult” horrors of racist dehumanization. As the girl lays down her wreath of flowers Walker’s...
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COLLEGE FEMINISMS: Dating Your Genitals

June 5, 2015
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By Quinn Israel   Imagine this scenario: you’re at a bar, and you see someone across the room. This someone appears to be the perfect soulmate. You go up to them, and you have an amazing conversation. They have all the qualities you want in a partner and more, and they’re one of the most attractive people you’ve ever met. The chemistry is there, and there’s no denying that...
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Transgender Medicine: Medicare Access to What?

June 4, 2015
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Image credit: www.lgbtqnation.com

By Eric Plemons After a debilitating injury at work left Shane Smith permanently disabled, he joined the ranks of more than 50 million Americans who receive health insurance through Medicare. Smith used the federal program to manage his injury-related care but, as a transgender man, he also wanted to use Medicare benefits to cover the cost of chest reconstruction surgery that was an important part of his transition from...
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A Review of Mecca Jamilah Sullivan’s Blue Talk and Love by Sarah Mantilla Griffin

June 3, 2015
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Review: Blue Talk and Love by Mecca Jamilah Sullivan  “A Block Party in Blue Mood” by Sarah Mantilla Griffin   We have been waiting for a collection like this. In fourteen short stories, Mecca Jamilah Sullivan’s Blue Talk and Love transports readers from Harlem to Ethiopia and from the 19th century to the contemporary period; it includes the voices of an eight-year-old girl, of conjoined twin circus performers, and...
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