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Afterword: On Violence - The Feminist Wire

Afterword: On Violence

Of particular critical interest to us are social and political phenomena that block, negate, or limit the satisfaction of goods or ends that humans, especially the most vulnerable, minimally require for living free of structural violence.

–from The Feminist Wire Mission Statement

Over the past few days, many artists and writers have reflected on some of the ways that violence permeates modern civil and political society—how it operates and what effects it has on people. We have seen beautiful poetry, haunting short stories, and insightful essays. The reflections have focused on violence by various definitions and at various scales—from that of the individual psyche, to the interpersonal, to broadly structural forms of violence—like gendered violence and the violence against Black people, Native peoples, and other People of Color that structures US civil and political society.

We invite you to look through these pieces and take up the questions raised.

The Precarity of Latino/a Child-Citizen Subjects: From Dora the Explorer to Child Deportees

October 8, 2012

by Nicole Guidotti-Hernández

 

Black Spaghetti;” or, “Spaghetti al Nero di Seppia”

October 8, 2012

by John Murillo

 

Sounding Off: On Violence

October 9, 2012

by Darnell L. Moore and Isaiah M. Wooden

 

Editor’s Commentary: On Violence

October 9, 2012

by Omar Ricks

 

Africanized: A Story

October 9, 2012

by Omar Ricks

 

Phantasmagoria; or, The World is a Haunted Plantation

October 10, 2012

by Selamawit D. Terrefe

 

Siempre En Mi Mente: On Trans* Violence

October 10, 2012

by Francisco J. Galarte

 

Bait Car

October 11, 2012

by Tria Andrews

 

Louder Than the Dark: Toward an Acoustics of Suffering

October 11, 2012

by Nicholas Brady

 

The Hooferman

October 12, 2012

by Natalie Diaz

 

Tradition Left These

October 12, 2012

by Royce K. Freeman

 

Violence on the Border

October 12, 2012

by Laura Ilardo

 

Riding Past the Limits of Coalition Politics

October 13, 2012

by Juliana “Jewels” Smith

 

Coming-of-Age in Sal Si Puedes

October 13, 2012

by Rosebud Ben-Oni

 

Violence Knows No Gender

October 13, 2012

by Xoaquima Díaz

 

Fluency

October 14, 2012

by Royce K. Freeman

 

Disciplining Violence

October 14, 2012

by Connie Wun

 

Bad Blood?: The Visibility and Invisibility of Violence in the Antagonism Between Native Americans and African Americans

October 14, 2012

by Tria Andrews and Olivia Chilcote